Wouldn’t it be nice to insert a video into your Google Doc and bypass the whole path to YouTube?  Google has recently made this much easier to do! Now you can insert videos right into your Google Doc and have them play while your students are still inside the document. 

First create your document, use tables, colors, whatever you need. Next copy the YouTube URL to the video. Paste it right into your document, and click on the tab key as prompted. This will make it look like a video link, instead of just the ugly link. (If you don’t click the tab key, it will still insert a link to the video, however the option of playing the video inside the document will not work.) read more

Read More

If you’ve never used suggesting mode in Google Docs, it is a really useful tool. Docs has three modes – Editing, Suggesting and Viewing. You can change to any of the modes by clicking on the pencil icon in the toolbar.

Editing mode is the standard mode that you’ll use when creating a document. It allows you to type and make all changes to a document. It’s the normal “word processing” view. In Suggesting mode, any changes become suggestions that can be either accepted or rejected. Viewing mode puts your document into a “reading” mode to show you what it will look like when printed. read more

Read More

Earlier in the summer we heard from Google that they were planning on adding a citation tool to Google Docs. Now those of us who have been using it for a while remember the Research tool which let you add citations to documents with footnotes. Google replaced the feature in 2016 with the Explore tool which includes the ability to add citations as well as pictures to items referenced in the document that were sourced online.

Fast forward to October 2020 and by now most of you will have a brand new citation tool available to you in Google Docs. This tool is much more robust and for all you language arts teachers, yes you can now use it to create proper bibliographies and not just footnote references. read more

Read More

A new tool, Compare Documents, is appearing from the Google Docs Tools menu. This feature makes it easier to locate changes between two documents over a period of time. Teachers may want to use this tool to see the development of a student’s writing process. Students will begin with an original file and then make a copy of the original and add revisions to the copied version. The Compare Documents tool will create a third copy. The newly generated document will show all suggested edits from both files and the name of the person who made the suggestions. read more

Read More

Google defines a word cloud as “

an image composed of words used in a particular text or subject, in which the size of each word indicates its frequency or importance.”  The word cloud above is from a 1991 report where my sister interviewed my grandpa about his service in the United States Army during WWII. By looking at the image, you will notice certain words are larger and bolder because they appear more frequently in the report. read more

Read More